Tuesday, February 9, 2016

No More Free Drinks

Men in College men starting to get the message about rape culture. They
are so scared about being called rapists and getting thrown out of
school through false allegations that they are now no longer going out
with college girls and buying them drinks. So if a man buys a woman a
drink he's a potential rapist and if he doesn't buy her a drink he's
cheap.



This is a game of catch 22 and men with rational minds see this
is a no win scenario so they are avoiding places that serve alcohol. I'm
hoping that college aged men stop taking women on dates to restaurants
for fear that women will order alcohol with their meal. I hope so called
rape culture takes women's free drinks and free meals away. I hope they
suffer by getting less male attention. The culture is essentially
training men to associate being generous to a woman with being a
potential rapist. So is it wonder that men are going their own way.
There is only so much suspicion a man can take before he just gives up,
walks away from the table and goes his own way.



Here is a partial
reading from the article from the Washington Examiner talking about this
issue. "Thanks to an increased focus on sexual assaults on college
campuses – mostly due to an overblown statistic claiming 20 percent of
college women have been sexually assaulted – young college men are
starting to rethink how they talk to women. At first glance that might
seem like a good thing – men learning to be more respectful of women and
not be so rapey – but that’s not what this is. This is about men
actually avoiding contact with women because they’re afraid a simple
kiss or date could lead to a sexual assault accusation. Bloomberg
reporters John Lauerman and Jennifer Surane interviewed multiple men
from colleges like Harvard and Stanford who expressed concern over what
was once known as a "hook-up culture" but is now labeled by feminists as
"rape culture." The change in terminology ensures that all
responsibility is placed on men, just because of their gender. Take
Malik Gill of Harvard University, who said he wouldn't even give a
female classmate a beer. “I don’t want to look like a predator,” Gill
told Bloomberg. “It’s a little bit of a blurred line.” Gone are the days
of buying a woman a drink – even if it’s just to be nice. Gill also
told Lauerman and Surane that after he passed on the contact information
of a woman who said she was interested in his fraternity brother, his
friend was hesitant to call her. “Even though she was interested, he
didn't want to pressure her,” Gill said. “He was worried about making
her feel uncomfortable.” William Pollack, a Harvard Medical School
psychologist, told the Bloomberg reporters about a patient who was
kissing a girl during a party and began thinking about what would happen
if things went further. “‘I want to go to law school or medical school
after this,’” the student said, according to Pollack. “‘I said to her,
it’s been nice seeing you.’” Pollack also noted that the media attention
to campus sexual assault has led to a “witch-hunt” mentality. “Most
males would never do anything to harm a young woman,” Pollack told the
Bloomberg reporters. But the current focus is “starting to scare the
heck out of the wrong people.”